Hyundai’s 2012 3.8 R Spec Genesis coupe

 

Early Tuesday morning I get a call on my cell phone. It’s from a man in the lobby of my building. They never come up to the 4th fl) I go to meet a tall thin man who, after a bit of small talk, passes me the keys and scurries off in a hybrid Elantra. I make my way out to the lot with mixed emotions, on the up side, for the next 7 days I’m taking hold of a 350HP, RWD sports car with a good ol’ fashion 6 speed gearbox. What’s troubling is that it’s made by Hyundai. Now don’t get me wrong, I know Hyundai does well in economy class and also with their new Genesis sedan. But I have yet seen a true performance car from them. What am I to suspect when it comes to chassis and suspension?  After all, if they don’t match up with all that power, it will make for a very disappointing week.

 

Exterior – The 2012 Genesis coupe is surprisingly mature. Long gone are the oddly shaped panels of the Tiburon.  When viewing its profile, the new Genesis somewhat resembles the G37 The smooth slopping lines flow nicely across the hood and roof. The lines across the side moldings, curving over the wheel wells are well proportioned and placed as well, giving the car a more mature sporty look. Sporty but not with sharp creases or jagged lines. Part of the Hyundai family but clearly standing on its own. And the new Genesis carries that theme through every angle Until you follow the lines down the hood and arrive at the front grill. And when you do you will notice the lines do become jagged and the wide mouth front end looks much like the Nisan GTR, it really obstructs the harmony of those beautiful lines.  That aside, it’s a spectacular looking carmovie The Boss Baby

 

Interior – Flowing nicely from the outside appeal, the new Genesis has a mature looking interior but its not quite on par with the outer appearance. The seats are nice and firm but comfortable, they do a good job of holding you in place in when you get into some more aggressive driving. Its what you would expect from a part time track car. The instrument cluster is simplistic. With a prominent tach and speedometer, with digital temperature and fuel gauges on smaller dial inside the speedometer and tachometer. This is a mistake to me, Id much rather have a real needle for these indications. Especially the temperature. I also found myself wanting a bit more color and style in this cabin. My seats were a nice contrasting red and there were small red door cards to help break up all the black. But that was it! When seated behind the wheel the appearance isn’t as striking as it is from outside the car and you begin to notice a mismatch of quality vs corner cutting. Eg, the steering wheel wrap feels nice and firm but the gear shifter (although it looks pretty) feels plasticy. And the placement for the radio and climate controls feels and looks all wrong. While the window switches and door locks are well thought out and perfectly positioned high up on the door and out of the way.

Tech This being the R-Spec, sacrifices in creature comforts were to be expected. Eg. No heated seats, no climate control, no home link. This makes sense, Shave weight and produce a slightly faster and better handling car. However, the connection between performance and some of the items absent from the car don’t compute. e.g. The standard 170watt, 6 speaker monochrome display head unit. There is no option to upgrade this head unit to the 360 watt infinity head unit. And the opening for the radio is custom. So to finagle an aftermarket head unit into that space will require a decent amount of modding. Now, this is what I don’t get- I’m guessing the premium head unit with better controls and a 7” color touch screen adds about 5lbs. That’s not going to make or break anyone’s lap time. Why not make this an option? I don’t feel a car company should limit a buyers entertainment options as music and Nav are very important to buyers. Below the radio controls are another unique item. 3 analog dials monitoring Fuel, Torque and Oil (Which I feel should be exclusive to the R-spec).  As a track car, oil pressure can be useful and watching the amount of torque created can be fun. But the placement is not ideal. You would have to look too far away from the road to get the readings. I would also like to see a chronograph in the R-spec with stop and start switches on the wheel. I would use that far more frequently than any of the existing gauges.

Bluetooth is standard as well as an IPod and usb jack. The Bluetooth worked rather well with my iphone, but the cable for the ipod appeared to be an afterthought. The cord is about 3”s long and plugs in behind a little door in front of the shifter. The cord is too short to move your ipod to the glove box or another safe location and the slot behind the door is too shallow to hold a standard Ipod or iphone. So while driving you risk launching your device. The bottom line on the R-Spec is this.  You’re given what you need and nothing more. It offers very little in terms of premium tech gear.

 

Performance

When a car carries the badge “R Spec”, you expect the characteristics of a track orientated car (even though there’s  a “track version” which is suited for comfort not track) So I was more then willing to put the coupe through its paces. At the turn of the key, I cracked a grin. I’m guessing you will to. As the cars 306Hp 3.8 V6 produces a nice low rumble, pretty close to what you would get in a V8. Not at all what I was expecting from Hyundai. But sound is only one aspect, and a small part of the experience in comparison. How does the R-Spec drive, corner and brake? Now eager to drive and find out, I exit the lot and begin my first drive. I quickly noticed that the throttle was very sensitive.  A smooth/modest roll- off in 1st is actually a bit tricky to get use to. The power of this big V6 is there when needed and comes trough very linear, making it a comfortable car to drive fast. Turn onto a twisted road however and it’s a mixed bag. I didn’t feel as comfortable cornering at speed in this car. I know the road well and I know how fast I have entered this particular corner in other cars, but in this car, I find myself backing off the throttle. The back just didn’t feel planted. When I forced myself to enter hot, the car took it with no fuss, skidding or skating. So it’s not that it can’t, it just feels like it can’t. And feel is a large part of what makes a track car. I found that the brakes were a good fit for the R-Spec. Pedal feel and stopping distance were a good match for the V6 engine. And the car is easily controlled as well thanks to the Traction and stability control, which can easily be switched off.  And off is the position I preferred. While off, the car is actually well behaved, even when driven at a spirited pace.  However the lack of TC and SS gives the car personality. Stomp the gas coming out of a corner and the back end breaks free then catches traction as expected, making the car so much more enjoyable.

However, when run hard and straight, this car really shines. Much like an American muscle car, the sound and power of the Genisis coupe encourages you to lay flat that throttle and rip down every open straight away you come across. I found myself doing downshift passes all the way home, overtaking everything that didn’t have a siren attached.  This car can run from 60-110 with such ease. And if you keep your foot planted, you’ll soon be in the 140 range. And it’s a pleasure to experience as the delivery is smoother then expected. The pedals are orientated well for heel-toe and the shifts are crisp on your way up to 6, while backing down a gear is even more enjoyable, as the engine note changes to a sudden  high rev pitch, ready to launch you back into action. Yes, this car is simply fantastic on the highway.

 

Summary The Genesis Coupe R spec is a blast to drive. Boasting an awesome sound track, great looks and has the “oomph” that will allow you to run with some of the big boys. All of this is placed in a price range that’s under $30,000. But if it’s my money, I wouldn’t buy, nor would I recommend the R-Spec version. The limited options offer no real benefits for your sacrifices.  But as I drove the R spec and enjoyed it more and more, I came to find my real complaint wasn’t with the car as a whole. It was with the trim levels. They’re confusing. Hyundai should think about re-working this coupe line up to better represent this fine automobile. I would suggest the 3 options below which would be priced from lowest to highest.

Base-  keep this one as is.

Track- No moon roof, no back seats, LSD, special sport tuned suspension with bigger sway bars, upgraded brakes, alcantara interior option, special exhaust, sport wing and chronograph clock.

GT – equip this version with a LSD, larger wheels and tires, better seats, NAV, leather, moon roof, upgraded head lamps and a body kit.

Not only do I feel customers would appreciate the clarity, but Hyundai will now be catering to the different pools of drivers that this car attracts.

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