2012 Nissan Murano

 

When you think Nissan Murano, you think… ?

 

 From generation to generation, the lines of the Murano haven’t changed much. This is, in part, due to the success its had from its inception. But it’s interesting how, like with many vehicles, the sexes seem to disagree. The styling has done well over the years appealing to mostly woman while most men choose to go with a full size SUV.  But as I began to use this vehicle throughout the week, I would encourage men and those with young families to take another look at the Murano before passing it by. For starters, I feel this vehicle is purpose built. The conveniences of power split fold down seats, power hatch and the entertainment pkg (complete with DVD) complements its purpose and caters to the young family in many ways. The styling also fits this purpose. Take for example the vehicle height. At a glance, the angles of the Marano give it a deceivingly tall appearance. Fact is, it actually rides relatively low. This height illusion is created by sharp hood angles and a thin narrow grill. This allows the headlamps to sit up nice and tall, which in-turn makes the crossover appear taller than it is, giving the driver a little more clearance but not awkwardly tall making stability an issue. This also makes for a car that’s easy to climb in and out of or to comfortably strap in your little one without the annoying bending over and inside the car. The height in the cargo area is also ideal for loading and unloading –Again, purpose built. Once inside the Murano, I found the cockpit comfortable. The view however was a bit of a mix bag. The Murano sits you at a height that allows you to see further down the road, which is a plus. But with the disappearing hood and fenders of the Murano, I also found myself being extra careful when swinging this vehicle into a parking space.

The LE model I was given is loaded with options to make travel life easier on the driver. Smart key entry allowing you to keep your hands free. Back up camera, Headrest monitors with headphones, Voice activated NAV, XM radio and the list goes on. One thing I came to appreciate about the Murano  is that along with all that tech, there were a variety of ways to control them. Via voice, touch screen, physical buttons on the wheel, as well as physical buttons on the center console or a combination of the 4. What I didn’t like about this cabin was the layout. This is where Nissan seems to have lost their focus. There’s not a simple set of streamlined controls. For the most part, it’ll take some getting used to. For example, the Climate controls at the bottom of the center console sits too low. When making adjustments while driving you, I found myself staring down into a dark area looking at buttons that I couldn’t readily read the labels on. The fact that they match the radio knobs right above it doesn’t help either as I often make adjustments by feel. The touch screen was responsive and user friendly. I actually preferred using it over voice and the real buttons. But while using it, I would often bump one of the real buttons below the screen sending me into a menu I didn’t want. What’s worse, it often canceled out the city and street name I just typed in making for a frustrating experience. Moving those controls away from the screen would make life easier on the driver.

The Nissan Murano’s 3.5 VQ  engine delivers 265HP and it transmits well to the wheels. This is accomplished through a continuous variable transmission (CVT) that delivers exceptionally smooth acceleration and passing power. The push this vehicle delivers was a bit surprising considering the size. I was not impressed however with the road noise or feel. I’ve read other reviews and albeit quick this cross over doesn’t drive and feel like a car. Hard breaking and quick lane changing reveals what it is. Which is 4000 lbs of vehicle. I never feared tipping the truck, but at speed it didn’t feel planted either. I actually found the car tramlining quite a bit as I drove up I95.

When I add up all that the Murano has to offer it really is a good buy for a young on the go family. It has the elbow room, the cargo room and is able to get you from point A to B on an average of 21mpg. Not bad. However the main factors that stand against the Murano are price, size and reliability. There are full size SUVs that offer competitive fuel economy with the benefit of added space as well as some light towing and more off road maneuverability. And with a starting cost of 30,000 some may not want to forgo those extra features. As I also spoke with some of my friends that owned earlier models of the Murano, Their biggest concern was reliability. It seems that many of the earlier models developed problems arpund year 3 and from there forward it became a money pit fixing AC, broken hoses, window regulators etc. But when these previous owners got behind the wheel of the 2012, they found the newer Murano smoother, more responsive and more comfortable then the former. What started as I would not recommend quickly turned to this is nice. But the fact of the matter is, those horror stories are out there.  This generation of Murano was released in 2009 and Edmunds lists the so called “common problems” with the current model. Hopefully these will go away with the 2012.

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